MEDIA
Cherokee Tribune & Ledger
Letter to the Editor | August 31, 2017

 

A self-professed Northerner who should know better about what it means to be denigrated as a people wants to tell us these Civil War monuments here in the South are all about history and heritage.

Germany doesn’t fly the swastika or pay homage to their ovens. Where are the monuments to the poor Southerners who gave literally their all to fight for a losing cause, to the women who were mostly left behind, or to the people who were enslaved and families torn apart to provide free labor for this country?

We’re paying Mr. Fein’s public salary to pen his view of the world in a safe group of “conservative” newspapers each week. Since he’s not from here, I’ll take a moment to educate him on why many of these monuments really exist. Back when many of these statues were erected, it wasn’t about honoring these men but a way for Southern legislators to pretend the Civil War was about state’s rights and that the South should stay segregated.

When I grew up here, I experienced separate schools, hospitals, ambulance services, businesses, seating, bathrooms, marriages, churches. It was the same stupidity that persists today and why we pay the health care bills for other states while Southern citizens get sick and die and hospitals close but insurance companies grow wealthier.

It’s why we’ve been told to divide ourselves by religion and by school choice. It’s why we can still get fired for sexual orientation and are letting gun lobbyists make it acceptable for us to bring guns on college campuses. It’s why during a time when Georgia was the leading state for bank failures and the fourth in the country for home foreclosures, our state legislators knew best how to spend federal dollars to keep people in their homes by not spending it to help homeowners.

Some strong money and influence told us to fight that Civil War just like they do with every other war. Good Southerners were duped then and have never recovered.

As we try to attract more business to this area, it’s important to remember that hate and division continues to cost this state. We should keep many of these relics but put them in their proper place and in correct historical reference, to contemplate not celebrate, and not wish to go back to that place.

I thought they valued critical thinking at Fein’s liberal arts college? For these are monuments to failure and to the failures of not working together to solve problems.

Patrick Thompson

 
League of Women Voters

www.ajc.com/voterguide & www.lwvga.org | May 2, 2016

 

Over 40 years of successful business & collaborative volunteer experience – in the classroom as a Science educator, building businesses at top hi-tech companies & growing Ga jobs by leading renewable energy startups. Ran for Ga Senate 54 v Chip Rogers & US House District 11 v. Phil Gingrey. sending them to lobbyist roles where they really wanted to be. That lack of public service practice & integrity is what motivates me to want to help improve the lives of Georgians.

 

If elected, what would be your top three priorities and how would you work to achieve results?

1. Restore educational investment & reward teachers for the multi-tasking professionals they are & for the unbelievable workload demanded from them in working with our most important investment, our children. Keep public funding for use with our public schools, prevent push for privatization & corporate takeover of schools. Help our youth with true local control - providing smaller class sizes, more resources, less testing, more time for individualized plans, seek corporate investment for trade/tech schooling. Improve affordability of college, return HOPE to needs-based priorities, greater accountability of Lottery system for educational priorities as founded. Strengthen adult retraining programs to maintain the career pipeline. Job networking groups are full of people seeking meaningful work – hire a small army of para-professionals & education career explorers. Lack of success in education leads to high teen pregnancy rates, poor health, higher poverty, increased crime & a Georgia reputation that suffers.

2. Make healthcare more preventative, affordable and available – move towards a universal system without private insurance between us & great healthcare resources. Accept expanded Medicaid.

 

3. Increase infrastructure investments for quality of life, commuting to work & growing jobs. Integrated, inter-community plans from Councils made of professionals & citizens. Plan for Intermodal transportation, energy, communications, water, public safety & greater connectivity.

 

 

At least five rural hospitals have closed their doors since 2013 and Georgia has the worst maternal mortality rate in the nation, with 35 maternal deaths for every 10,000 live births. How would you address the lack of healthcare access in rural areas?

Accept expanded Medicaid under ACA. The ACA will help where uninsured rates are highest, our rural areas. All Georgia taxpayers are paying for other States that have adopted the ACA, but get no benefit. Improve State outcomes & quality with adoption of ACA & beyond. We’ll need protected interest-earning healthcare savings accounts to augment the lack of corporate investment in human capital.

 

Restore Medicare & Social Security cuts & increase program longevity by raising income caps. Develop smaller clinics in more areas with rotating services & the use of allied health professionals, paramedics, substance abuse professionals, dental & physician assistants to fill some of the gaps in gaining consistent care.

 

Use more mobile clinics like those used by the VA to take services to the communities underserved. Obstetric services are one of the critical mobile services needed to combat both rural & urban mortality rates.

 

Reverse movement to privatize mental health services – this will endanger rural areas further. Transition some old hotels into extended care facilities. We need more GPs and allied health professionals – National Health Service Corp - help fund education & encourage the career paths in exchange for settling in some of the corners of the largest State East of the Mississippi. Provide telehealth programs to extend knowledge from concentrated areas of the State to rural clinics. Use Federal programs, teaching colleges, 3RNet job matching to recruit more workers.

 

 

Foreign-born Georgians own 31% of the businesses in our state. Legal Permanent Residents and naturalized citizens contribute approximately 1.8 billion dollars in state and local taxes each year. How will you help ensure Georgia is a welcoming place for foreign born entrepreneurs and their families?

Georgia should proudly broadcast that we’re an attractive place for starting new businesses for all types of people. That means stopping efforts that go against that notion – religious freedom, English language only, immigrant pursuit, ID requirements – these can broadly brush the perfectly legal with guest & undocumented workers.

 

Labor shortages on main streets also show up in agriculture areas where multi-generational families stop showing up to work Georgia farms due to fear. These types of actions take investments from the state and result in taxpayer loss. We should be known as a state of discriminating taste, not a state that discriminates. Offer instead business coaching, entrepreneurship training, legal advice, mentoring and access to capital to make certain they continue a success trajectory.

 

Attracting and retaining immigrants of any legal status will be important to diversifying our skills to match changing Georgian demographics. Many of their “main street” businesses are just as important to our economy as the highly-skilled, highly-credentialed Georgia executive – both build stability and tax base. With a lack of official Federal policy, we should model cities like Nashville and their “Welcoming” movement. Bring together community resources, government offices and local chambers to encourage and market success. Highlight economic success on current population to demonstrate how all sides benefit. We should market to those being run out other States by tight immigration laws.

The current minimum wage in Georgia is $7.25 an hour. A person working 40 hours makes $290 a week, approximately $1160 a month. Do you support raising the minimum wage, why or why not?

Decades have passed since minimum wages were raised at the Federal level. GA embarrassingly stands alone at $5.15 as the low for those not covered under the Fair Labor Standards Act. I’m probably the only GA Senate candidate who works a minimum wage job at night to help pay for my entrepreneurial interests. I’ve encountered many hard working people, mostly parents, who must work two or more jobs to make ends meet. There are few with any benefits, especially health insurance, which is an unaffordable chunk of their pay rate. Not healthcare, health insurance. Those who get the 40 hour week with some benefits are usually managers who put in much more than 40 hours per week while paid a salary. Productivity - all-time high in Georgia, but not healthy or productive for the worker. Risk has been shifted from the business to the worker. Little preventative care taking place, no one can afford an accident & there are regular decisions made about things like food or gasoline. I hear from many who manage large retail/food chains here that a rise in minimum wage would cause them to hire fewer workers/cut hours. However, this isn’t happening in areas that have allowed more people to participate in the local economy by raising minimum wages. Many citizens are starting to understand that they pay to assist those in our local community who make low wages/work low hours in supporting families. These people spend 100% of what they make in our local community. We should support better pay. 

Cherokee Tribune & Ledge
Letter to the Editor
 
 
Cherokee Tribune Voter Guide
Cherokee Tribune & Ledger News| Rebecca Johnston | April 19, 2016

Vision Statement

 I bring true public service to better the lives of Georgians. First, return budget to public education for our youth; career training for adults. Help our children by supporting teaching professionals, local control, smaller classrooms, individual emphasis over constant testing, hire/retain quality resources, improve college affordability.  

Second, accept Federal resources to implement the Affordable Care Act so more Georgians improve health outcomes; stop funding 38 other States with our tax dollars. Work to expand access/affordability by removing health insurance companies from between us and the best healthcare resources in the world. Repairing these two areas with an ethical, collaborative approach will reduce much of the stress on Georgians. Add to that greater career continuity by growing healthcare professions, infrastructure development jobs, and technology/energy roles. Our quality of life needs transportation and pedestrian options beyond a choice of asphalt grade; our construction and zoning variance velocity needs a smarter, connected, cross-community planned approach. Our legislature must stop shifting the tax burden to the poor and working people in our community while handing out corporate welfare with no accountability. This is hard work and we should expect an effective government, a fair market, transparent regulation and public stewardship.

  

1. What do you propose the state should do to improve state roads in Cherokee County and to reduce commuter traffic and congestion?

Start cross-regional, comprehensive planning boards comprised of professionals and citizens for smarter growth that connects residents with the places they go for shopping, education, travel, and work. Leverage GT research as 1 of 6 members of the National Center for Sustainable Transportation. Redesign traffic flows for efficiency with better zoning/impact planning. Pursue Federal grants/funding, public/private partnerships in order to widen traffic options to include light rail, pedestrian/bike paths, carpooling and bus. Shift construction work to making current properties more valuable and energy efficient. Require builders to participate in the construction of infrastructure they’re taking advantage of in the marketing properties. 

 

2. Do you support initiatives to legalize gambling, such as pari-mutuel betting and casino gambling in Georgia? What is your position on gambling in general?

If this is all about generating budget for our State, this will be yet another regressive tax on citizens. The matter should be decided by voters that completely understand the costs and issues. Follow the money - concerned that the gambling lobby will talk only about State revenue (where does it go?) and the few (mostly low-paying) jobs it will create. Gambling can be an addictive public health problem - Fantasy Sports gambling sucks money from our local economy (and children) while pretending to be a “skills” exercise. Funding college educations with gambling? Our current Lottery needs more accountability.

 

3. Will you support the religious freedom measures in the next session and how do you believe it benefits the state?

 An unnecessary exercise/expense to Georgia taxpayers. Citizens should be wary of bills that travel here from lobbying organizations. Money from all kinds of consumers is still green and if you’re in a business that says no to money from some kinds of people, you may need a new business plan. Existing laws protect clergy/churches. The State needs to attract investment; start up/maintain business as part of our quality of life. Major corporations based here are diverse with their employment, hiring, promotion and benefits. This country is founded on the freedom to practice our religion but not necessarily upon others.  

Reporter Newspapers
Sandy Springs Reporter | Joe Earle | May 10, 2016
1. Why are you running for this office?

The lack of public service practice & integrity is what motivates me to want to help improve the lives of Georgians. Lobby money, gifts & trinkets have destroyed our democracy & the people I pledge allegiance to helping. Our legislative agenda is set by groups from outside our State & is costing Georgians jobs, wasting taxpayer dollars, & generating negative results. Most of our legislators have forgotten who they work for. We’re at the top of the worst State rankings while racing to the bottom of the categories the State needs to excel in. Corporate welfare, privatization of public roles, and industry influence is shifting taxes & fees to the poor and working people in our communities so that everyone ends up paying more. Georgia needs new ideas and needs people representing them in office that actually work for them. I seek the endorsement of the people of this area - the ballot is full of people that tout their industry endorsements and money thrown their way.

 

2.  Why should the voters choose you?

I am the only candidate across Georgia that's only interested in serving the public - I accept no funds, no lobby money or gifts. My values are both conservative and progressive. I would ask all to look beyond their Party, groups & media to work with someone who truly represents them. I support many who have no one speaking for them – those like our youth, seniors, the poor, disabled, immigrants, & the environment. If you’re motivated like me to build an effective, transparent, bribery-free representative government that gives every voter the power of a voice, I hope to get the opportunity to magnify your voice. I’m listening.

 

3.  If elected, what’s the first thing you want to accomplish in office?

Restore public education budgets & reward teachers for the multi-tasking professionals they are & for the unbelievable workload demanded from them in working with our most important investment, our children. Keep public funding for use with our public schools, prevent push for privatization & corporate takeover of schools. Help our youth with true local control - providing smaller class sizes, more resources, less testing, more time for individualized plans, seek corporate investment for trade/tech schooling. Improve affordability of college, return HOPE to needs-based priorities, greater accountability of Lottery system for educational priorities as founded. Strengthen adult retraining programs to maintain the career pipeline. Job networking groups are full of people seeking meaningful work – hire a small army of para-professionals & education career explorers. Lack of success in education leads to Georgia's high teen pregnancy rates, poor health outcomes, higher poverty, higher use of public services, increased crime& a Georgia reputation that suffers.

4. What do you see as the biggest problem facing the district you seek to represent?

Rampant, unplanned development with too many zoning variances and lack of planning. We need to develop integrated, inter-community plans with Councils composed of professionals & citizens. Plan for Intermodal transportation (light rail, pedestrian, biking, buses), energy, communications, water, public safety & greater connectivity. We need to work with all stakeholders to reduce and repair the disconnected overdevelopment taking place in our District, replacing it with smarter, resilient growth that makes our current development more valuable. We should Leverage GT research as 1 of 6 members of the National Center for Sustainable Transportation. Redesign traffic flows for efficiency with better zoning/impact planning. Shift construction work to making current properties more valuable and energy efficient. Require builders to participate in construction of infrastructure they’re taking advantage of in the marketing of properties.

5.  What do you see as the biggest problem facing the state?

Lack of universal healthcare is a drag on our economy and the lives of our citizens. We are one of the worst States in providing health insurance solutions to our citizens, especially our children and the poor. We have some of the best healthcare professionals in the country but our people can't get to those resources; we're trading preventative care for costly emergency care while many Georgians are very sick or dying, losing homes and businesses unnecessarily.

 

We should first accept expanded Medicaid under the ACA. This will help where uninsured rates are highest and hospitals are closing, our rural areas. All Georgia taxpayers are paying for other States that have adopted the ACA, but get no benefit. Improve State outcomes & quality with adoption of ACA & move to a universal model absent of the high costs of the private healthcare insurance industry. We’ll need protected interest-earning healthcare savings accounts to augment the lack of corporate investment in human capital. Restore Medicare & Social Security cuts & increase program longevity by raising income caps. Reverse movement to privatize mental health services. We need more GPs and allied health professionals - help fund education & encourage the healthcare career paths in exchange for settling in some of the corners of the largest State East of the Mississippi. Provide telehealth programs to extend expertise to rural and urban clinics.

6.  If a “religious freedom” bill similar to the one passed this session and vetoed by Gov. Deal is offered again next year, how would you vote on it?

No, I wouldn't vote for this unnecessary bill nor expend Georgia taxpayer resources in pursuit of anything which doesn't improve the lives of Georgians. Citizens should be wary of discriminatory bills that travel here from outside lobbying organizations with false names and exploiting divisive issues. Existing law protects clergy/churches. The State needs to attract investment; start up/maintain business as part of our quality of life. Major corporations based here are diverse with their employment, hiring, promotion and benefits.

7. If it comes up again in the legislature next year, would you support some form of new tax to expand MARTA?

Yes, we need to increase integrated transportation infrastructure investments for quality of life, commuting to work & growing jobs. Atlanta is a hub for all types of transportation, but we're in danger of losing the infrastructure workers and businesses alike need for prosperity. We can't pave our way out of this, we need to connect our transportation resources and we need an architecture that includes different modes.

Primary Election - Northside Neighbor

Everett Catts | May 25, 2016

“The key to winning this primary was acknowledging the top concerns for citizens here and letting them know how I planned to help them,” Thompson said. “Georgia’s primary system and having legislators draw district lines is a farce. Open ballots is actually a closed system. Voters must pick a party ballot. If you pick an independent ballot, you only get to vote on nonpartisan positions, such as judges.”

 

Dems Gather to Watch Nomination -

Ledger News

Shaddi Abusaid | August 30, 2016

Local Democratic Party leaders, organizers and candidates from the 11th Congressional District gathered in an Acworth pub Thursday evening eager to watch Hillary Clinton formally accept the party’s nomination for president. About 40 progressives from Cobb, Cherokee and Bartow came together to watch the convention, optimistic about their party’s chances of defeating Donald Trump and retaining the presidency come November.

 

Party members say they sometimes get discouraged living in such a red area of a red state, but that it is important to remain positive and organized, particularly when it comes to local politics.

Three Democrats running for office in November took turns giving speeches about their platforms and the importance of hitting the campaign trail hard in the months leading up to the November elections.

 

Woodstock resident Patrick Thompson, who is running against state Sen. John Albers, R-Roswell, for the District 56 seat said if the conventions were parties, he knows which one he’d attend.

“The difference between the two conventions was night and day,” he said. “There couldn’t be more contrast.”

 

He said while national politics are exciting, local elections are far more important than presidential elections.

 

“I’m worried about our guys down in Atlanta focusing on getting more guns in more places, religious liberty, things that discriminate, things that restrict voting or access to health care,” Thompson said. Improving schools, roads, infrastructure and pay are the things they should be focusing on instead, he added.

 

Thompson said he believes Clinton’s campaign could end up attracting voters who typically lean Republican.

 

Neighbor Newspapers 2016

mdjonline.com | April 29, 2016 | Ross Williams (excerpts)

 

Two Democrats are battling for the chance to take on District 56 State Sen. John Albers, R-Roswell, in the November election. 

Before they can face Albers, Akhtar Sadiq and Patrick Thompson will duke it out in the May 24 primary. The district includes part of Sandy Springs, most of the north Fulton area and part of Cherokee County.

Sadiq did not respond to the Neighbor's requests for an interview by phone or email.

How long have you been a resident of District 56?

I was gerrymandered into the District by Chip Rogers during the last census to prevent me from running against him again. We've lived in our home for over 20 years.

 

Have you run for office before?

Yes, ran for Georgia Senate 54 v Chip Rogers and US House District 11 v. Phil Gingrey.

Political experience:

Ronald Reagan White House with DOI, GW Bush Transition Office, Clinton Reinventing Government Office

 

Community/volunteer experience:

18 years as BSA Scoutmaster, Georgia Water Coalition, Sierra Club, Chattahoochee Riverkeepers, Must Ministries, Drake House, North Fulton Charities, Goodwill, Appalachian Trail Club, Red Cross, area food banks & career networking groups

Other relevant experience:

40 years serving in public education, community service and corporate America with cutting edge computer enterprise applications, electric vehicle software and solar deployments

What have been your greatest accomplishments?

Professionally, numerous sales and alliances awards for opening markets, pioneering solutions, leading teams, global efforts and job creation - responsible for $Billions in revenue for the companies where I've worked. Department of Energy Environmental Leadership Award for improving the Smart Grid. President's Community Service Award. BSA Leadership Award. Presidential Physical Fitness Awards. Personally, as an Eagle Scout, being involved in helping over 50 young men accomplish their Eagle Leadership Projects.

What are your top three issues moving forward?

1. Restore educational investment & reward teachers for the multi-tasking professionals they are & for the unbelievable workload demanded from them in working with our most important investment, our children. Keep public funding for use with our public schools, prevent push for privatization & corporate takeover of schools. Help our youth with true local control - providing smaller class sizes, more resources, less testing, more time for individualized plans, seek corporate investment for trade/tech schooling. Improve affordability of college, return HOPE to needs-based priorities, greater accountability of Lottery system for educational priorities as founded. Strengthen adult retraining programs to maintain the career pipeline. Job networking groups are full of people seeking meaningful work – hire a small army of para-professionals & education career explorers. Lack of success in education leads to high teen pregnancy rates, poor health, higher poverty, increased crime & a Georgia reputation that suffers.

2. Make healthcare more preventative, affordable and available. Move towards a universal system without private insurance between us & great healthcare resources. Accept expanded Medicaid for our State. The ACA will help where uninsured rates are highest and hospitals closing, our rural areas. All Georgia taxpayers are paying for other States that have adopted the ACA, but get no benefit. Improve State outcomes & quality. Restore Medicare & Social Security cuts & increase program longevity by raising income caps.Develop smaller clinics in more areas with rotating services & the use of allied health professionals, paramedics, substance abuse professionals, dental & physician assistants to fill some of the gaps in gaining consistent care. Use more mobile clinics like those used by the VA to take services to the communities underserved. Obstetric services are one of the critical mobile services needed to combat both rural & urban mortality rates. Reverse movement to privatize mental health services. We need more GPs and allied health professionals – National Health Service Corp - help fund education & encourage the career paths in exchange for settling in some of the corners of the largest State East of the Mississippi. Provide telehealth programs to extend knowledge from concentrated areas of the State to rural clinics. Use Federal programs, teaching colleges, 3RNet to recruit more workers.

3. Increase integrated transportation infrastructure investments for quality of life, commuting to work & growing jobs. Develop integrated, inter-community plans from Councils composed of professionals & citizens. Plan for Intermodal transportation (light rail, pedestrian, biking, buses), energy, communications, water, public safety & greater connectivity. We need to work with all stakeholders to reduce and repair the disconnected overdevelopment taking place in our District, replacing it with smarter, resilient growth that makes our current development more valuable. Decelerate zoning variances.

 

What is your vision for the district's future?

An effective, responsive government that respects public stewardship. Fair trade, not fixed trade. Regulated capitalism. A move to measuring & marketing our growth by something closer to a Genuine Progress Indicator - measuring social, economic and environmental progress - closer to our Constitutional view of justice, tranquility, security, general welfare, and the blessings of liberty. I want to see us make deliberate moves to keep our area unique and special. A top educational community. A train into town. A raise in minimum wage. Affordable living for more people to stay, work & grow here. A welcoming attitude where all can be hired, promoted & appreciated. Entrepreneurs, including immigrants, running businesses & contributing to the fabric of our area.

What do you see as the biggest challenges to that vision, and what are your plans to overcome them?

Lobby money, gifts, travel & trinkets have destroyed our democracy & the people I pledge allegiance to helping. I set an example by accepting no campaign money or gifts of any kind. Our legislative agenda is set by groups from outside our State & is costing Georgians jobs, wasting taxpayer dollars, & generating negative results. I want to see it made illegal for our representatives to hold memberships in groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council (lobby for lobbyists) or to accept and bring forward copies of these manufactured bills. Move to publicly funded campaigns & end lobby money - I've had to sign up for this in business & would like to see the same pledge from representatives. A State amendment to end Citizen's United & the dark money that comes with it. We’re at the top of the worst State rankings while racing to the bottom of the categories the State really needs to excel in. Corporate welfare, privatization of public roles, restricting voting rights, and the parking of capital & jobs overseas is shifting taxes & fees to the poor and working people in our communities. Everyone pays more when we don't all participate. Lobby money interferes with decisions that help Georgians.

Why are you the best person for the job?

My interest in returning this role to one of public service for the people. There's a lack of public servant practice & integrity in our representation. This is what motivates me to want to help improve the lives of Georgians. I ask all to look beyond their Party, groups & media to work with someone who truly represents them. I support many who have no one speaking for them – those like our youth, seniors, the poor, disabled, immigrants, & the environment. If you’re motivated like me to build an effective, transparent, bribery-free representative government that gives every voter the power of a voice, I hope to get the opportunity to magnify your voice. I’m listening.

Neighbor Newspapers 2016

mdjonline.com | April 29, 2016 | Ross Williams (excerpts)

 

Two Democrats are battling for the chance to take on District 56 State Sen. John Albers, R-Roswell, in the November election. 

Before they can face Albers, Akhtar Sadiq and Patrick Thompson will duke it out in the May 24 primary. The district includes part of Sandy Springs, most of the north Fulton area and part of Cherokee County.

Sadiq did not respond to the Neighbor's requests for an interview by phone or email.

How long have you been a resident of District 56?

I was gerrymandered into the District by Chip Rogers during the last census to prevent me from running against him again. We've lived in our home for over 20 years.

 

Have you run for office before?

Yes, ran for Georgia Senate 54 v Chip Rogers and US House District 11 v. Phil Gingrey.

Political experience:

Ronald Reagan White House with DOI, GW Bush Transition Office, Clinton Reinventing Government Office

 

Community/volunteer experience:

18 years as BSA Scoutmaster, Georgia Water Coalition, Sierra Club, Chattahoochee Riverkeepers, Must Ministries, Drake House, North Fulton Charities, Goodwill, Appalachian Trail Club, Red Cross, area food banks & career networking groups

Other relevant experience:

40 years serving in public education, community service and corporate America with cutting edge computer enterprise applications, electric vehicle software and solar deployments

What have been your greatest accomplishments?

Professionally, numerous sales and alliances awards for opening markets, pioneering solutions, leading teams, global efforts and job creation - responsible for $Billions in revenue for the companies where I've worked. Department of Energy Environmental Leadership Award for improving the Smart Grid. President's Community Service Award. BSA Leadership Award. Presidential Physical Fitness Awards. Personally, as an Eagle Scout, being involved in helping over 50 young men accomplish their Eagle Leadership Projects.

What are your top three issues moving forward?

1. Restore educational investment & reward teachers for the multi-tasking professionals they are & for the unbelievable workload demanded from them in working with our most important investment, our children. Keep public funding for use with our public schools, prevent push for privatization & corporate takeover of schools. Help our youth with true local control - providing smaller class sizes, more resources, less testing, more time for individualized plans, seek corporate investment for trade/tech schooling. Improve affordability of college, return HOPE to needs-based priorities, greater accountability of Lottery system for educational priorities as founded. Strengthen adult retraining programs to maintain the career pipeline. Job networking groups are full of people seeking meaningful work – hire a small army of para-professionals & education career explorers. Lack of success in education leads to high teen pregnancy rates, poor health, higher poverty, increased crime & a Georgia reputation that suffers.

2. Make healthcare more preventative, affordable and available. Move towards a universal system without private insurance between us & great healthcare resources. Accept expanded Medicaid for our State. The ACA will help where uninsured rates are highest and hospitals closing, our rural areas. All Georgia taxpayers are paying for other States that have adopted the ACA, but get no benefit. Improve State outcomes & quality. Restore Medicare & Social Security cuts & increase program longevity by raising income caps.Develop smaller clinics in more areas with rotating services & the use of allied health professionals, paramedics, substance abuse professionals, dental & physician assistants to fill some of the gaps in gaining consistent care. Use more mobile clinics like those used by the VA to take services to the communities underserved. Obstetric services are one of the critical mobile services needed to combat both rural & urban mortality rates. Reverse movement to privatize mental health services. We need more GPs and allied health professionals – National Health Service Corp - help fund education & encourage the career paths in exchange for settling in some of the corners of the largest State East of the Mississippi. Provide telehealth programs to extend knowledge from concentrated areas of the State to rural clinics. Use Federal programs, teaching colleges, 3RNet to recruit more workers.

3. Increase integrated transportation infrastructure investments for quality of life, commuting to work & growing jobs. Develop integrated, inter-community plans from Councils composed of professionals & citizens. Plan for Intermodal transportation (light rail, pedestrian, biking, buses), energy, communications, water, public safety & greater connectivity. We need to work with all stakeholders to reduce and repair the disconnected overdevelopment taking place in our District, replacing it with smarter, resilient growth that makes our current development more valuable. Decelerate zoning variances.

 

What is your vision for the district's future?

An effective, responsive government that respects public stewardship. Fair trade, not fixed trade. Regulated capitalism. A move to measuring & marketing our growth by something closer to a Genuine Progress Indicator - measuring social, economic and environmental progress - closer to our Constitutional view of justice, tranquility, security, general welfare, and the blessings of liberty. I want to see us make deliberate moves to keep our area unique and special. A top educational community. A train into town. A raise in minimum wage. Affordable living for more people to stay, work & grow here. A welcoming attitude where all can be hired, promoted & appreciated. Entrepreneurs, including immigrants, running businesses & contributing to the fabric of our area.

What do you see as the biggest challenges to that vision, and what are your plans to overcome them?

Lobby money, gifts, travel & trinkets have destroyed our democracy & the people I pledge allegiance to helping. I set an example by accepting no campaign money or gifts of any kind. Our legislative agenda is set by groups from outside our State & is costing Georgians jobs, wasting taxpayer dollars, & generating negative results. I want to see it made illegal for our representatives to hold memberships in groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council (lobby for lobbyists) or to accept and bring forward copies of these manufactured bills. Move to publicly funded campaigns & end lobby money - I've had to sign up for this in business & would like to see the same pledge from representatives. A State amendment to end Citizen's United & the dark money that comes with it. We’re at the top of the worst State rankings while racing to the bottom of the categories the State really needs to excel in. Corporate welfare, privatization of public roles, restricting voting rights, and the parking of capital & jobs overseas is shifting taxes & fees to the poor and working people in our communities. Everyone pays more when we don't all participate. Lobby money interferes with decisions that help Georgians.

Why are you the best person for the job?

My interest in returning this role to one of public service for the people. There's a lack of public servant practice & integrity in our representation. This is what motivates me to want to help improve the lives of Georgians. I ask all to look beyond their Party, groups & media to work with someone who truly represents them. I support many who have no one speaking for them – those like our youth, seniors, the poor, disabled, immigrants, & the environment. If you’re motivated like me to build an effective, transparent, bribery-free representative government that gives every voter the power of a voice, I hope to get the opportunity to magnify your voice. I’m listening.

October, 2012

Endorsed by Alliance for Retired Persons

 

Strong commitment to improving the quality of life for older Americans

 

(WOODSTOCK, Ga.) Patrick Thompson is sincerely proud to represent the concerns of the Alliance's more than four million retirees, older Americans, and community activists (including nearly 61,000 Georgians). He was cited for his leadership and commitment on issues such as preserving and protecting Social Security and Medicare from privatization and benefit cuts.

 

In addition, Alliance members can support Patrick Thompson's candidacy because of his belief in the need to provide more affordable health care for older Americans, as well as the need for stronger retirement and pension security, and quality long term care.

 

The Alliance for Retired Americans "believes that Patrick Thompson's election to the House of Representatives will enhance the quality of life for older Americans" and congratulated him on their endorsement.

 

Thompson said, “It's great to be recognized by a group that helps support and protect some of our most vulnerable citizens. It's even better to be able to partner with the Alliance in understanding their members' issues and laying out a policy foundation that preserves our commitment to seniors. This segment of our population has given back to their families and communities all their lives and many are now regretting the possibility of working into their 80's in order to make up for losses in property value and retirement funds."

 

The Alliance for Retired Americans works to ensure social and economic justice and full civil rights for all citizens so that they may enjoy lives of dignity, personal and family fulfillment and security. The Alliance advocates a progressive political and social agenda that respects work and strengthens families. The organization works to protect and preserve programs vital to the health and economic security of older Americans.

Patrick strongly believes that public servants should serve the people, not big corporations. His campaign will NOT accept funds from those with paid interests.

  • Facebook Clean Grey
  • Twitter Clean Grey
  • LinkedIn Clean Grey
  • Instagram Clean Grey

© 2017 by Patrick Thompson

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: